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Show me yours (access required)

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission apparently prefers one-way streets to two-way communications. In a federal lawsuit over discriminatory hiring practices, the EEOC demanded that BMW hand over its internal policy on criminal background checks for job applicants. BMW obliged, but ...

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The least famous Reindeer of all (access required)

Just in time for Christmas, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down a decision in a case emanating out of North Carolina by citing to precedent laid down in the little-known case of United States v. The Reindeer. Chief Justice John ...

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Just sign here (access required)

Clients should trust their attorneys—but not this much. Earlier this month, the North Carolina Court of Appeals upheld a trial court’s order dismissing legal malpractice claim because the client had negligently contributed, in part, to his own predicament. Attorney Joseph ...

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First blood in Uber fight (access required)

Good news for anyone who likes waiting longer and paying more for taxi rides to and from the airport —a Charleston man last week became the first known Uber driver in the Holy City region to be cited for violating ...

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A blog, here, to dog-ear (access required)

EvidenceProf Blog, a blog edited by University of South Carolina law professor Colin Miller, has been chosen as one of the top 100 legal blogs in the country for 2014 by the American Bar Association Journal. This is the first ...

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Bar exam blame game (access required)

Passage rates for the July 2014 bar exams were down all across the country (including down by more than 5 percent in South Carolina), leading to a round of recriminations and finger-pointing in search of a culprit. Now the National ...

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My bar exam was harder than yours (access required)

Any lawyer who passed the bar in California or New York will insist that those two states have the most difficult bar exams. But, do they? Associate Professor Robert Anderson of Pepperdine University School of Law attempted to answer this ...

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