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Author Archives: Diana Smith

TV shows, junkyards and gambling are all part of her appellate work

Kirsten Small is an appellate attorney in the Greenville office of Nexsen Pruet. A Washington state native, Small graduated from Georgetown Law School in 1994. She then completed a federal clerkship in Greenville. Small is a member of the South Carolina Bar's ethics advisory committee and secretary of the trial and appellate advocacy section. She is also active in the Defense Research Institute, where she serves as a liaison for the appellate advocacy committee and chairs the networking subcommittee for the women in the law committee.

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Non-Lawyer to Lawyer: Dog-lending at Yale Law? Not a top-tier idea

Pretty much everyone knows I'm a dog girl. Not the I-love-all-canines-so-much-I'm-going-to-adopt-10-million-of-them type of woman, but I'm definitely of the mind that my Labradors are members of the family. I guard them as fiercely as I do any human being I love. In fact, I can remember only one period in my life when I went without Labs for an extended period of time - my three years of dorm living in college.

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Ready, aim, CLE: Course combines primer on gun law with target practice, weapons permits (access required)

Get ready to channel your inner Daniel Boone or Annie Oakley. There's still time to sign up for two South Carolina Bar-sponsored courses that will teach attorneys the ins and outs of gun law - and allow them to spend their afternoons firing weapons to qualify for concealed-weapons permits. Incorporating target practice is a newfangled twist on the average firearms CLE, which is offered by bars in several states. But "the South really likes their guns," said Doug Kim, an intellectual property attorney who is helping coordinate the May 6 CLE in Greenville.

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Attorney: Paralegals have tougher job, deserve more respect

Marcy J. Lamar is special counsel with McKay Cauthen Settana & Stubley in Columbia, where she practices workers' compensation law. She is co-author in multiple editions of The Law of Workers' Compensation Insurance in South Carolina and a member of several professional associations, including the American Bar Association, Richland County Bar Association, S.C. Defense Trial Attorneys' Association and the Young Lawyers Division of the S.C. Bar.

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Value billing arrangements depend on lawyers and clients agreeing ‘We’re in this together’ (access required)

The much-maligned billable hour is back under scrutiny. As attorneys continue to bounce back from the blows dealt by the recession, a client-driven fee structure known as value billing is beginning to gain traction across the country. It was a "standing room only" topic of discussion among lawyers at the American Bar Association's meeting earlier this month in Atlanta, according to ABA President Stephen Zack (pictured). "When I started practicing law 40 years ago, you sent out a bill for services rendered, and then all of a sudden we got into the Holy Grail of the hourly bill, which was never intended to be the perfect solution to all issues," Zack told Lawyers Weekly.

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Q&A: The billable hour is here to stay, but its monopoly is gone

Reyburn W. Lominack III is an associate in the Columbia office of Fisher & Phillips. He represents employers in state, federal and appellate courts, as well as administrative tribunals. Lominack focuses his practice on Title VII, FMLA, ADA, ADEA and FLSA matters. He also assists traditional employers in issues such as union-avoidance campaigns, unfair labor practice charges, grievance arbitrations and collective-bargaining negotiations.

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Case unexpectedly brings together three members of the USC Law Class of 1977 (access required)

In 1974, Geoff Waggoner felt a tap on the shoulder while studying in the University of South Carolina's law library. The tall, redheaded, young law student turned around and saw a classmate standing before him. "You Waggoner?" the inquirer asked. "Yes," Waggoner replied, perplexed. That's when Jay Gouldon, now a Charleston attorney, introduced himself - not as a member of Waggoner's law school Class of 1977, but as a former teammate on the soccer field at Eaton Hall prep school in London 19 years earlier.

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Q&A: Highlight of his year: Going to Omaha (for baseball) (access required)

Ronald Cox is a founding member of Proffitt & Cox in Columbia. A graduate of the University of South Carolina at Aiken, Cox graduated with a B.S. in business administration in 1993. He went on to receive a law degree from the University of South Carolina School of Law. Here he discusses his decision to start a new small firm during tough economic times.

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Support crucial for women lawyers to serve in politics (access required)

"You live through it." Newly elected state Rep. Elizabeth Munnerlyn (D-Chesterfield, Marlboro) uses that phrase to explain how she managed to run a full-time law practice, keep up with her two young children and successfully campaign for political office over the past year. Where some politicians might be able to "put everything on hold and just campaign, I did not have that luxury," said Munnerlyn, who is a solo practitioner in Bennettsville. "You just take it one day at a time, and I found there were a lot of people who wanted to help."

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